Posted in Project

Knowing Project Prep III

My sources all look into the life and training of aspiring ballerinas. The first source includes several people’s stories with ballet, including a girl who pursued ballet despite being repeatedly told that she was too short, as well as one that struggled with weight during her training. These accounts of stereotypes in ballet and the specific body type that is generally associated with it can help me to generate questions about whether my subject ever felt like her body type ever didn’t live up to “ballerina standards.” My next source is about eating disorders and their frequency in ballerinas. It builds on the information described in my first source and analyzes the body type considered ideal for ballerinas and the lengths that some girls will go to in order to maintain that weight. The next source is about a ballet institution in the UK that starts training girls for the Royal Ballet from the time they’re 11 years old. The intensity of their training leads many girls to drop out, and, though this is the extreme of ballet training, it still helps to foster questions about how intense Mrs. Chrest’s training was and at what age she started and how competitive the training was. The fourth source was about the average diet and exercise of a ballerina, which also can help me to come up with questions like what she usually ate during her training, if there were extreme exercise requirements, and other questions like that. My final source is an outline of common ballet injuries and how they occur. I imagine any severe injuries would cause a major setback due to the competitive aspect of the training described in my third source. From this, I’ll ask questions about any major injuries, whether short or long-term, that Mrs. Chrest might have suffered from her training. Though many of my sources share bits of information, I believe that they all contribute different aspects to my interview and base knowledge of the subject.

Works Cited
Blank, Christopher, et al. “Too Fat? Too Thin? Too Tall? Too Short?” Pointe Magazine, DanceMedia, pointemagazine.com/inside-pt/issuesaprilmay-2011too-fat-too-thin-too-tall-too-short/. Accessed 20 Oct. 2016.
“Eating Disorders among Ballet Dancers.” CoachUp, http://www.coachup.com/resources/dance/eating-disorders-among-ballet-dancer. Accessed 20 Oct. 2016.
Jennings, Luke. “Will They Make It to the Royal Ballet?” The Guardian, Guardian News and Media, http://www.theguardian.com/stage/2012/mar/25/will-they-make-royal-ballet. Accessed 20 Oct. 2016.
Lindenmuth, Katy. “The Busy Lives of Ballerinas: 3 Pros Share Their Daily Eating and Exercise Routines.” Glamour Health, http://www.glamour.com/story/ballerina-diet-exercise-eating-plan. Accessed 20 Oct. 2016.
Milan KR. “Common Ballet Dance Injuries.” Injury in Ballet: A Review of Relevant Topics for the Physical Therapist. CBI Health Centre, http://www.myphysio.ca/physiotherapy-education/common-ballet-dance-injuries/.

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